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| Last Updated:: 25/12/2017

Chintpurni

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

Chintpurni is a major pilgrimage Centre and one of the Shakti Peethas in India. The Chintpurni shakti peeth (Chhinnamastik shakti peeth) is located in Una district Himachal Pradesh state, surrounded by the western Himalaya in the north and east in the smaller Shiwalik (or Shivalik) range bordering the state of Punjab. Situated at the altitude of 940 meters, the temple rests on one of the highest peaks of the Sola Singhi range of hills. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The temple is one of the 7 major and 51 total Shakti Peethas. Here, Chhinnamasta is interpreted as the severed-headed one as well as the foreheaded-one. It is believed that Sati’s head fell at this place and is thus considered one of the most important of the 51 Shakti Peethas. 

 

 

According to Markandeya Purana, goddess Chandi defeated the demons after a fierce battle but two of her yogini emanations (Jaya and Vijaya) were still thirsty for more blood. Goddess Chandi cut off her own head to quench Jaya and Vijaya’s thirst for more blood. 

 

 

She is usually shown holding her own severed head in her hand, drinking one stream of blood spurting from the arteries in her neck, while at her side are two naked yoginis, each of whom drinks another stream of blood. 

 

 

Chhinnamasta, the headless goddess, is the Great Cosmic Power who helps the sincere and devoted yogi to dissolve his or her mind, including all the preconceived ideas, attachments and habits into the Pure Divine Consciousness. Cutting off the head suggests the separation of the mind from the body that is the freedom of the consciousness from the material confines of the physical body. 

 

 

The temple is believed to be founded by Pandit Mai Das, a Saraswat Brahman after the Goddess revealed herself to him. He established this shrine of Mata Chintpurni in Chhaproh village twenty-six generations ago.

 

 

Over time this place became known as Chintpurni after the eponymous deity. The descendants of the Brahmin still live in Chintpurni and perform prayers at the Chintpurni temple. 

 

 

In the center of the Temple is the temple garbha griha (sanctum). The image of Mata Chintpurni Devi is installed here in the form of a pindi (a round stone). People queue up for a darshan of the Devi and make their prayers and offerings. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Chintpurni fair, locally known as Mata Da Mela (fair of the mother Goddess), is celebrated with fervor at the temple. Held thrice a year in the months of Chet (March-April), Sawan (July-August) and Asanj (September-October). In Chet and Asanj, the fair is held in Navratras whereas in Sawan it takes place during the first ten days of shukla paksha which is the bright half of the lunar month. The fair continues day and night for nine days during the navratras and for ten days in Sawan

 

 

The usual offering, by a devotee, consists of seven pieces of betelnut (supari), a piece of coconut (nariyal), a red flag (dhawaja), all bound together with home-spun multi-colored cotton-yarn (mauli). On the 8th day of the fair, the offerings of ‘Karah’ (halwa) and ‘chattar’ with 84 tiny bells hanging on its fringes, representing 84 lacs births in different forms of the devotee form which he or she seeks salvation from the Goddess.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: 

 

http://hillpost.in/wp-content/uploads/2007/09/govsep13.jpg?x21897

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bxTmxPCzXs